The Anti-Government Movement Guidebook

Why We Have Posted
The Anti-Government Movement Guidebook
On Our Website

Staff
Project Advisory Committee - 6
TOC - 7
Preface - 12
Acknowledgements - 14

Part I - 16
    Common Law and Uncommon Courts: - 16
    An Overview of the Common Law Court Movement - 16
    Posse Comitatus - 18
    Avoiding Legal Authority - 21
    Hidden History as Justification - 22
    The Posse and the Common Law - 24
    First Wave of the Common Law Movement - 29
    Decline and Resurgence - 34
    The Future of Common Law Courts - 44

Part II - 46
    Tactics in the Courtroom - 47
    Challenging Subject Matter Jurisdiction - 47
        A. The Gold-Fringed Flag Issue - 47
        B. Typical Responses to the Flag Objection - 48
            1. Noting the Objection - 48
            2. The Contempt Power - 48
            3. Acquiesence - 49
        C. Additional Authority - 49
    Federal Courts - 49
    State Courts - 49
    Challenging Personal Jurisdiction - 51
        A. The "Sovereign" vs. the "Corporate" Citizen - 51
        B. Typical Responses to the Personal Jurisdiction Issue - 52
            1. Note the Objection and Move On - 52
            2. Use of the Contempt Power - 53
            3. Engaging the Party in Argument - 53
        C. Additional Authority - 54
    Federal Courts - 54
    State Courts - 54
    Demanding Use of "The Common Law - 55
        A. Demanding a Strict Interpretation of "Common Law - 55
        B. Typical Responses to the Common Law Demand - 56
            1. Acquiescense - 56
            2. Continue over objection - 57
    Significance of "The Bar - 58
        A. Refusing to Enter the Bar - 58
        B. Typical Responses to the Bar Argument - 59
            1. Acquiescense - 59
            2. Refuse to Accommodate/Contempt - 59
            3. Creative Resolution - 60
        C. Additional Authority - 59
            1. The First Amendment Problem - 60
            2. Titles of Nobility - 60       

Part III: Disrupting the Operation of the Court - 62
    Refusing to Speak / Identify Oneself - 63
        A. Refusal to Identify Oneself - 63
        B. Typical Responses to Refusals to Identify - 63
            1. Scheduling - 64
            2. Alternative Identification - 64
            3. Bonds and Contempt - 64
    Silence/Filibuster - 63
        A. Party Chooses to Remain Silent or Party Chooses to 'Filibuster - 66
        B. Typical Responses to Silence/Filibuster - 66
            1. Contempt Power - 66
            2. Entering a Plea on the Party's Behalf - Where - 67
            3. Ordering Silence/Compliance With Rules - 67
        C. Additional Authority - 67
            1. Gagging Party
            2. Removing Party From Proceedings - 67
            3. Generally - 68
    Demanding "Counsel of Choice - 69
        A. Party Requests to be Represented by a Non-Lawyer - 69
        B. Responding to Requests to be Represented by a Non-Lawyer - 69
            1. Barratry - 70
            2. Waiver of Right to Counsel - 70
    Verbal Threats Against the Court - 71
        A. Party Makes Verbal Threats Against the Court - 71 
        B. Responding to Threats Made by Members of the Movement - 71
            1. Calm/Warning - 71
            2. Contempt - 71
            3. Report Threats - 72
            4. Reassure Jurors, Take Extra Safety Precautions - 72
    Hunger Strikes - 72
        A. Party Begins a Hunger Strike - 72
        B. Responding to a Hunger Strike - 72
            1. Safeguarding the Party's Well Being - 73
            2. Minimize Negative Publicity - 74
    Attempts to Disqualify the Judge - 75
        A. Judicial Disqualification - 75
        B. Typical Responses to Judicial Disqualification or Recusal - 76
            1. Responses to Typical Motions for Recusal/Disqualification - 76
                a. States That Allow Peremptory Challenges - 76
                b. States Which Allow Removal For Cause - 76 
            2. Responses to Civil Actions Filed Against Presiding Judge - 77
    Forms of Pleadings - 78
        A. Party Files "Odd" Documents/Uses Antiquated Pleading Forms - 78
        B. Responding to Unusual Documents - 79
            1. Explain Court Rules and Adhere to Them - 79
            2. Make Clear Rulings - 79
            3. Thoroughly Consider Documents and Arguments - 79
            4. Give Opportunity to Cure Defects in Pleadings - 80
    Refusal to Sign Documents - 81
        A. Party Refuses to Sign Documents - 81
        B. Responding to a Party's Refusal to Sign Documents - 81
            1. Consequences - 81
            2. Acquiescence - 81
            3. Contempt/Bonds - 81

PART IV: Tactics Outside of the Courtroom - 83
    Interactions with the Clerk - 84
        A. Appearance at Office/Window/Counter of Court Clerk - 84
        B. Clerk Responses to Members of the Movement
            1. Train Personnel to Identify Members - 84
            2. Have Written Policies 
            3. Personnel Should Remain Calm and Courteous - 85
            4. Be Ready, Willing and Able to Explain Policies - 85
            5. Notify up the Chain of Command - 86
    Actions Against Court Personnel - 87
        A. Service of Process/Personal Suits Against Court Personnel - 87
        B. Responses to Service of Process/Personal Suits - 87
            1. Avoid Confrontation - 87
            2. Notify up Chain of Command - 88
            3. Retain Counsel, if Needed - 88
            4. Retaliate - 88
        C. Additional Authority - 88
            1. Personal Liability for Civil Rights Suits - 88
                a. Who is a "person" - 88
                b. Under color of state law - 89
                    i. Symbiotic relationship - 89
                    ii. Public function - 89
                    iii. Close nexus - 89
                    iv. Joint Participation - 89
                c. Immunities - 89
                    i. Qualified Immunity - 89
    Threats Against Court Personnel - 90
        A. Threats Against Court Personnel - 90
            1. Have a System in Place - 90
            2. Ensure Personnel are Trained - 90
            3. Do Not Engage the Party - 90
            4. ALWAYS Inform Law Enforcement or Court Security - 90
    Violent Actions - 92
        A. Members of the Movement Become Violent - 92
        B. Clerk Responses - 90
            1. Training/Support for Personnel - 92
            2. Preventive Measures - 92
            3. Involve Law Enforcement IMMEDIATELY - 92

Part V: Trial Court Performance Standards
            1. Access to Justice - 93
            2. Expedition and Timeliness - 93
            3. Equality, Fairness and Integrity - 93
            4. Independence and Accountability - 94
            5. Public Trust and Confidence - 94
    Relationship Between Responses and the TCPS
            1. Access to Justice - 96
            2. Expedition and Timeliness - 96
            3. Equality, Fairness and Integrity - 96
            4. Independence and Accountability - 97
            5. Public Trust and Confidence - 98

Appendix A: Resource Guide - 99
            1. Legislative Responses - 100
            1.1 Sample State Statutes - 101
            1.1.1 Simulating legal process (Examples) - 101
    Oregon Revised Statutes 162.355 - 101
    South Carolina Code of Laws 16-17-735 - 101
            1.1.2 Barratry - 103
            1.1.3 Paramilitary Training - 103
    Rhode Island General Laws 11-55-1 Definitions - 103
    Rhode Island General Laws 11-55-2 Paramilitary training prohibited. - 103
    Rhode Island General Laws 11-55-3 Penalty for violation. - 104
    Rhode Island General Laws 11-55-3 Penalty for violation. - 104
    Pennsylvania Consolidated Statutes 5515. Prohibiting of paramilitary training. - 104
            1.1.4 Threats to Public Officials - 105
                    California Penal Code 71.
                    Delaware Code Annotated 1240. Threats to public officials. - 106
            1.1.5 Exceptions to Duty to Record - 107
                    Ohio Revised Code Annotated 317.13 - 107
                    Missouri Revised Statutes 428.110 - 107
            1.1.6 Preventing Nonconsensual Liens Against Public Officials - 107
    Alaska Statutes 34.35.950. - 107
            Revised Code of Washington 60.70.010 - 108
            Intent-Definitions - 108
            Helpful Websites - 110
            Listserv for Court Management - 111

Appendix B: Movement Sources - 112
            1. Movement web pages - 113
            1.1 Patriots
            2. Militias
            3. Tax Protestors

Appendix C: Movement Documents - 116
            1. Tactics - 116
    Gold-Fringed Flag Returned to Court - 118
    Right Way L.A.W. Suggests: Quit Contracting for Traffic Tickets - 119
    The Federal System - 120
        A. The Federal Government (the United States). - 120
        B. The State Governments (the several states). - 120
        C. The Common Law States (the free states). - 120
        D. The effects of the 14th Amendment. - 120
    Affidavit - 121
    How to handle a Roadblock the Libertarian Way - 123
    THE CODE PROJECT: A New School of Law - 125
    Introduction - 125
    Forward - 126
    Changing United States Citizenship - 128
    AFFIDAVIT OF CITIZENSHIP INFORMATION AND DECLARATION - 131
    MEMO ON SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER - 133
    Briefs/Filings - 135
    ABATEMENT-Taxes - 138
    ABATEMENT-General - 141
    MOTION FOR DECLATATORY JUDGMENT - 147
    The Citizens Rule Book - 151
    JURY HANDBOOK - 151

    Section I A HANDBOOK FOR JURORS - 151
        YOU ARE ABOVE THE LAW! - 152
        LAW OF THE LAND - 153
        A SUMMARY OF THE TEN COMMANDMENTS - 154
        A SUMMARY OF THE COMMUNIST MANIFESTO - 154
        GIVE UP RIGHTS FOR THE "COMMON GOOD"? - 155
        INALIENABLE, (UNALIENABLE) OR NATURAL RIGHTS! - 155
        JURY TAMPERING? A JURY'S Rights, Powers and Duties - 155
        The Right of the JURY to be Told of Its Power - 156
        LAWS, FACTS AND EVIDENCE - 156
        HOW DOES TYRANNY BEGIN? WHY ARE THERE SO MANY LAWS? - 156

    Section II GIVE ME LIBERTY OR GIVE ME DEATH! - 157
        SCOURAGED FOR NOT TAKING A LICENSE! - 157
        JURY OF PEERS - 158
        WHO HAS THE RIGHT TO SIT ON A JURY? - 158
        FREEDOM FOR WILLIAM PENN - 158
        THE FIRST AMENDMENT - 159
        HE BROKE THE LAW! - 159
        IT IS ALMOST UNFAIR! - 159
        JEFFERSON'S WARNINGS! - 159

    Section III INDEX TO THE ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS - 160
        GENERAL INDEX TO: THE UNANIMOUS DECLARATION - 160
        GENERAL INDEX TO: CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES - 160
        GENERAL INDEX TO: THE BILL OF RIGHTS - 162
        ARTICLES - COMMON LAW - 162
        AMENDMENTS - EQUITY LAW - 162

    THE COMMON LAW: THE NEW PATRIOT "RELIGION" - 165
        Origin of Given Names - 166
        How Family Names Arose in Western Europe - 166
        Names from Animals, Places, Appearances - 167
        Surnames in Other Languages - 167
        Modern Jewish Surnames - 167
        Middle and Hyphenated Names - 167
        Style and Meaning in Given Names - 168
        Place-names and Trade Names - 168
    FEDERAL JURISDICTION - 179
    FEDERAL CRIMINAL JURISDICTION - 186
    TRY THE LAW - 189
        Colorado Findings of Fact and Redress for Grievances - 194
    INDIANA CONSTITUTION. ARTICLE I SECTION 19 - 198


LAWNOTES         HOME